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Foldables in Computer Science: Consolidating Our Learning

How might we help learners synthesize important computer science topics (including vocabulary, structures, and techniques) using Foldables? How might these three-dimensional graphic organizers help learners consolidate their learning, while also providing effective notes for later reference?

In designing learning experiences for new-to-CS educators, Toni and I considered how Foldables might dovetail nicely with the 10 Minutes of Code activities provided by Texas Instruments. The 10 Minutes of Code activities do a phenomenal job of crafting short learning episodes that provide students with bite-sized instructional episodes (see the Skill Builders) followed by opportunities to apply their new learning (see the Applications).

Toni and I wanted to build on these 10 Minutes of Code activities by layering additional content connections that deliberately drew out and discussed some of the computer science topics that are operating within the 10 Minutes of Code activities. Specifically, we were working to develop Foldables that formalized CS topics that were important for a beginning teacher of CS to know (as defined by the TExES Computer Science 8-12 certification requirements in Texas).

Our Foldable work is inspired by the top-notch work of Dinah Zike and her crew from Comfort, Texas. If you are new to the world of Foldables, be sure to check out Dinah’s site. Dinah has a ton of resources that support Foldable use and creation in all grade levels and subject areas. Here are some of my favourites: Notebook Foldables, Big Book of Math for MS and HS, and her Notebooking Central resources for Math.

Toni and I wondered: What would Foldables look like in computer science? This led us on a fun journey…! Here are some of the highlights.

Here is a Three-Tab Foldable that overviews introductory Program Protocols, including how to Create (using the Program Editor), Compile (using the Check Syntax & Store command), and Run (using a Calculator page) a program on the TI-Nspire handheld. These ideas connect to the work done in the Unit 1: Program Basics—Skill Builder 1: Introducing the Program Editor 10 Minutes of Code activity.

 

 

Here’s another example of a Foldable that uses a screenshot of a program and its output for a given set of actual parameters. This Shutterfold Foldable (with an inlaid screenshot) was used to annotate some details about Formal and Actual Parameters after we wrote our first program that used parameters (in the Unit 1: Program Basics—Skill Builder 2: Arguments & Expressions 10 Minutes of Code activity).

 

 

Here’s one of my favourites: a Matchbook Foldable that outlines how a For Loop operates. We used this Foldable to identify the four parts of a For loop, as well to practice tracing out a loop using a table. Notice the inclusion and annotation of a screenshot of the program. This Foldable formalized ideas from the Unit 4: Loops—Skill Builder 1: For Loops 10 Minutes of Code activity.

 

Here’s an awesome tweet from a learner in one of Toni’s workshops and his work with this exact Foldable! Love it!

We created similar Matchbook Foldables for While Loops and Do While Loops, but then also created this Three-Tab Foldable to compare and contrast the three types of loops (For, While, and Do While). This Foldable helped learners step back and consider the important similarities and differences across the three loop types that were studied throughout the Unit 4: Loops 10 Minutes of Code activities.

Here’s an example of using a Shutterfold Foldable to document and analyze two Computer Science techniques (specifically, using Counters and Accumulators). This builds on the ideas used in the Unit 4: Loops—Application: Bank Notices 10 Minutes of Code activity. Consider how a Foldable like this serves as a way to consolidate new information, but also as a helpful resource for later reference and use.

 

We have received really positive feedback about how these Foldables helped learners step back from the coding experiences and synthesize the ideas they were learning about and experimenting with in a meaningful way. The Foldables helped to organize and chunk the main ideas and were also really handy for revisiting ideas throughout the learning episodes.

The examples above are a sampling of the Foldables that Toni and I have created for formalizing CS topics. We love doing this work!

What other topics from computer science might be a good fit for Foldables? What other strategies might be effective for creating powerful Foldables for CS topics? How might Foldables dovetail into work with the TI-Innovator Hub and those 10 Minutes of Code activities?

Michelle Rinehart

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  • These are very exciting worksheets. For loops and do loops on that good old, off-white almost newspaper-quality worksheet paper that says “only schools have this.”

    I know Im out of touch because I have no idea what the story is with “Formal Parameters” and “Actual Parameters”; terms Ive never found before. In my day you had “command line arguments” or “switches,” “Parameters” were for function (method) calls, and 640k was enough for anybody.

    This is still progress as far as the curriculum goes. Theyre nice worksheets, to be certain.

Michelle Rinehart

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